Rebel Wilson, Adam Devine, and Priyanka Chopra are suckers for a good rom-com

The new satirical rom-com Isn’t It Romantic follows a cynical New York City architect (Rebel Wilson) who, after an encounter with a mugger renders her unconscious, wakes to discover her life has turned into a romantic comedy. Ahead of its release in theaters today, we sat down with stars Rebel Wilson, Adam Devine, and…

There are glimmers of BlacKkKlansman’s fire in an earlier Best Picture winner about American hate

Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by new releases or premieres, or occasionally our own inscrutable whims. With the Academy Awards right around the corner, we’re suggesting the perfect pairings for this year’s Best Picture nominees—movies to watch with, or instead of, each of them.

Matt Walsh and Judith Godrèche on Under The Eiffel Tower and getting drunk on set

The new romantic comedy Under The Eiffel Tower follows a middle-aged bourbon salesman (Veep’s Matt Walsh) who, in the midst of a mid-life crisis, travel across the French countryside and falls in love with a vineyard owner (Judith Godrèche). Ahead of its release on VOD, we spoke with Matt Walsh and Judith Godrèche…

Fighting With My Family can be pretty stirring, for a glorified WWE commercial

B-

Fighting With My Family is a shamelessly formulaic sponsored post of a crowd-pleaser that’s also, in its best moments, a genuinely stirring celebration of chase-your-dreams moxie. It presents the Cinderella (origin) story of professional wrestler Paige with just enough scrappy naturalism—enough English working-class…

There’s way more bohemian rhapsody in this earlier biopic of a stylish queer icon

Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by new releases or premieres, or occasionally our own inscrutable whims. With the Academy Awards right around the corner, we’re suggesting the perfect pairings for this year’s Best Picture nominees—movies to watch with, or instead of, each of them.

Bare-knuckle drama Donnybrook is pretentious and gratuitous—an unfortunate one-two

C

Populated by characters with names like Jarhead Earl and Chainsaw Angus, Frank Bill’s debut novel, Donnybrook, doesn’t necessarily aim to be perceived as naturalism, even if the meth-ravaged parts of Kentucky and Indiana where it takes place are very much based in reality. All the same, Tim Sutton’s screen adaptation…

Life is a Hotel By The River in a melancholy gem from South Korea’s Hong Sang-soo

B+

The characters of the wildly prolific and consistent South Korean writer-director Hong Sang-soo are awkward guests in lives of missed opportunity and dreamlike repetition, their insensitivities and drifting attentions paralleled by a predisposition to smoke, drink, and overstay one’s welcome. In that sense, Ko…

Birds Of Passage traffics in cliché, wrapping a familiar crime yarn in fascinating cultural fabric

C+

The first thing we see in Birds Of Passage, a drama set among the Wayúu people of northern Colombia, is a ritual courtship dance that seems to accompany a young woman’s coming-of-age ceremony. Entering a circle of family and friends, the man seeking the woman’s favor proceeds to run backwards, while she, face painted…

Jessica Rothe makes dying and comedy look easy with the convoluted fun of Happy Death Day 2U

B-

Most sequels are time warps: It’s the audience that gets stuck in a loop, experiencing the same premise all over again. So it should come as no shock that Happy Death Day 2U finds a way to zap sorority girl Tree (Jessica Rothe) right back into the live-die-repeat cycle she escaped at the end of 2017’s horror-comedy…

Have a love-hate relationship with rom-coms? Then Isn’t It Romantic is for you

B

To be sure, the truly hardened cynic will find plenty to pick apart in the new Rebel Wilson-led rom-com, Isn’t It Romantic. But such committed misanthropes, by definition, don’t enjoy much of anything. On the other extreme, the doe-eyed and optimistic will like the film—which extensively employs romantic-comedy…

The AIDS-era romance Sorry Angel tells a bracing story of love and loss

B+

The Paris of Christophe Honoré’s Sorry Angel is a world of blue. You see it in the plush navy seats of the theater where Jacques (Pierre Deladonchamps), a middle-aged writer with HIV, first meets Arthur (Vincent Lacoste), a handsome, slightly aloof student in his early 20s. You see it in the streets where the two get…

Here's how the VFX team behind Infinity War brought Thanos to the big screen

Thanos is undoubtedly one of Marvel’s most memorable on-screen villains, thanks both to Josh Brolin’s performance, and the visual effects team who designed the character and captured the performance. Luckily, their hard work has not gone unnoticed, as Infinity War’s VFX team was nominated for an Academy Award last…

Paul Scheer picks his top 5 worst movies—for real this time

A couple years ago, we asked Paul Scheer to rank his five worst movies of all time, but the list he came up with—which included Spider-Man 3 and The Last Airbender—hasn’t sat well with him. As the How Did This Get Made? host explained, “I just rattled them off immediately—I didn’t put any thought about it, and I felt…

Horror Noire author Robin R. Means Coleman gives us a crash course in black horror history

This week marks the debut of Horror Noire, a new documentary premiering on Shudder that sheds much-needed light on a subject that’s often joked about, but rarely discussed in a comprehensive way: the relationship between African-Americans and horror movies. The documentary features writers, actors, directors, critics,…

Phil Lord and Chris Miller on The Lego Movie 2 and why you should never say "Legos"

Emmet, Wyldstyle, and the rest of the Bricksburg heroes return to take on the evil Duplo invaders in The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part. Ahead of the film hitting theaters this Friday premiere, we sat down with the cast and creators to talk about the anticipated sequel. For our last interview we talk with producers and…

With Guardians Of The Galaxy, Marvel made household names out of interstellar second-stringers

Marvel was feeling itself. That’s the only real explanation. The comic book company had recovered from bankruptcy, blown out the idea of what a movie franchise could be, and been absorbed into the Disney maw. It had gotten the general public involved in dorked-out comic book ideas about extended continuity and…

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