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11/27/17
1:01 PM
5
Best Of
Shared from The A.V. Club
Best Of
Shared from The A.V. Club

Movie trailers have always been fascinating things: perched at the intersection of art and advertising, rearranging hints and fragments of what they’re selling into attractive new forms. But it wasn’t until you could play them at a click of a mouse that they became the objects of obsession they are today. The first

11/26/17
2:19 PM
4
VideoFilm Club
Shared from The A.V. Club
VideoFilm Club
Shared from The A.V. Club

We’re back with another edition of Film Club. This week, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky sit down to discuss Call Me By Your Name, the latest from Italian director Luca Guadagnino, and one of the most acclaimed films to come out of 2017’s Sundance Film Festival.

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11/22/17
11:39 AM
3
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club
C+
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club

Movies about writers always struggle with the fact that the writing process is almost unfilmable; the manual work of scribbling and typing letters is only a small, visible part of it. But The Man Who Invented Christmas, which dramatizes the six weeks that it took a cash-strapped Charles Dickens (Dan Stevens) to pen A

11/22/17
9:25 AM
8
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club
A-
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club

In Luca Guadagnino’s sensitive, sensual Call Me By Your Name, a bright teenage boy living in the picturesque Italian countryside falls into a passionate summer fling with an older man, the American graduate student who’s come to study for the season. That’s about all there is to the story, a tale of gradual seduction

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11/21/17
6:07 PM
5
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club
B-
ReviewsMovie Review
Shared from The A.V. Club

The baroque competence of Joe Wright, the director who never met a camera movement he couldn’t overwork, makes Darkest Hour one of the more enjoyable entries in the endless, post-King’s Speech cycle of mannered prestige biopics; it turns out there is something of an art to these things. But no amount of distancing

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