Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

My Teacher's Wife

Anyone with a decent budget and a few washed-up character actors can rip off Quentin Tarantino or the Coen Brothers, but it takes a special breed of hack to rip off a figure as marginal as '80s teen-movie director "Savage" Steve Holland, the auteur behind such late-night-cable fodder as Better Off Dead…, One Crazy Summer, and How I Got Into College. Though his work is largely unremarkable, Holland often utilized animated vignettes to comment upon and sometimes serve as transitions for his films' plots; the same is true of My Teacher's Wife director Bruce Leddy. In Leddy's film Jason London, like John Cusack in One Crazy Summer, plays a budding cartoonist who learns some valuable life lessons when he has an affair with a beautiful older woman. The older woman here is, as the title would indicate, the beautiful wife (Tia Carrere) of London's volatile calculus teacher (Christopher McDonald). Of course, anyone who has seen any other young-man-learns-about-love-from-an-older-woman coming-of-age comedy (Weird Science, My Tutor, Risky Business) will probably be able to predict exactly how things will turn out well before the conclusion of the opening credits. Shot in 1995 and known by the alternate titles Learning Curves and Bad With Numbers, but only recently released on home video, My Teacher's Wife provides very minor titillation (as well as a brief glimpse of the breasts of Carrere's body double) but ends in predictably wholesome fashion. The animated segments were created by a slumming Bill Plympton, and they're pretty much the only distinctive thing here, beyond a tacked-on ending that seems intended to trick viewers into thinking the film hasn't been sitting on a shelf for the last four years. "Where do you think we'll all be in 10 years, in 2008?" London asks his pals in the final scene (it's pretty safe to say that Leddy hedged his bets and shot it using half a dozen different dates). Unfortunately, it doesn't matter if My Teacher's Wife takes place in 1998 or 1898; it possesses a mediocrity that's timeless.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter