As anyone who had a working TV at the time probably remembers, back in 2010, a cave-in occurred at the San José copper-gold mine in Chile’s Atacama Desert, trapping 33 workers for two months under hundreds of metric tons of rock. The incident quickly became international news, with efforts to rescue the Chilean miners dominating the 24-hour news networks and drawing the eye of human drama and mining safety enthusiasts alike. Amazingly, given all the attention the collapse attracted—especially in light of the way writers and directors have glommed on to similar media flashpoints like the Benghazi attacks or the Boston Marathon bombing—only one film has ever been announced in connection with the event: The 33, from producer Michael Medavoy and Under The Same Moon director Patricia Riggen.

Now there’s a trailer for the film, giving audiences a glimpse at star Antonio Banderas as miner Mario Sepúlveda, and hinting at what was apparently the true cause of the collapse: an overwhelming burden of dramatic irony. Between all the pregnant wives, old fellas two weeks from retirement, and miners saying stuff like, “Boy, I hope we don’t get trapped down here,” in the trailer, it’s clear that there’s no force more dangerous on Earth.

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The trailer jumps back and forth between people on the outside, bickering about whether they’ll be able to rescue the trapped men—certain to be a teeth-clenching drama builder for anyone who lost track of the story on October 12, 2010, and hasn’t gone back to check on it since—and the mine, where the survivors are forced to endure both privation, and the threat that Banderas will keep saying thing like, “That’s the heart of the mountain. She finally broke,” in a whisper that makes it sound like the Nasonex Bee is finally about to break down and cry.